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Psalms

This tag is associated with 12 posts

Review of Biblical Literature Newsletter (May 1, 2015)

The latest reviews from the Review of Biblical Literature include: Francis Borchardt, The Torah in 1 Maccabees: A Literary Critical Approach to the Text, reviewed by Thomas Hieke Cilliers Breytenbach and Jörg Frey, eds., Reflections on the Early Christian History of Religion—Erwägungen zur frühchristlichen Religionsgeschichte, reviewed by Thomas J. Kraus Walter Dietrich, Die Samuelbücher im deuteronomistischen Geschichtswerk: Studien … Continue reading

Some Hermann Gunkel Works

I’ve recently had occasion to go in search of one of Hermann Gunkel’s essays. Along the way, I came across several of his works freely available online, including: Ausgewählte psalmen Genesis Israel und Babylonien: der Einfluss Babyloniens auf die israelitische Religion Das Märchen im Alten Testament Die Sagen der Genesis (English: The Legends of Genesis) Schöpfung und Chaos … Continue reading

Brueggeman, Spirituality of the Psalms

The June free book of the month seems already to be live on the Logos Bible Software website. The included text is Walter Brueggemann’s Spirituality of the Psalms (Fortress, 2001). The optional, $0.99 add on is Brueggemmann’s David’s Truth: In Israel’s Imagination and Memory (Fortress, 2002).

Tempting a Hen to Play a Chick(en)

In Matt 4:5–7; Luke 4:9–12, Jesus cites Deut 6:16 in response to his temptation at the temple. The full text there runs “you shall not test Yahweh, your God, as you tested him at Massah” (Deut 6:16; לא תנסו את־יהוה אלהיכם כאשר נסיתם במסה) and refers to Israel’s grumbling about their lack of water in … Continue reading

Rahlfs, Septuaginta-Studien

Internet Archive has the full text of Alfred Rahlf’s 1911 volume on the Lucianic recension of Kings in Septuaginta-Studein (vol. 3). The Archive also provides access to the earlier volumes on Kings (vol. 1: 1904) and Psalms (vol. 2: 1907) in a variety of formats.

Praying with Jesus

To demonstrate the superiority of Jesus’ sacrifice to those previously offered under the Torah, the writer to the Hebrews quotes a version of Ps 40:6–8 (Eng; 40:7–9 HB; 39:7–9 OG; Heb 10:5–9).1 In so doing, Hebrews fairly clearly situates its rendition of this psalm’s words as Jesus’ own (cf. Heb 10:10).2 If one were to … Continue reading

My Glory

Psalm 7 is an individual lament,1 and the superscript situates it as “concerning the words of Cush, the Benjaminite” (Ps 7:1 HB; על־דברי־כושׁ בן־ימיני‎).2 This situation is rather difficult to pinpoint precisely in the biblical narratives of David’s life.3 The OG reading Χουσί is reflected in Augustine’s text and leads him to relate Ps 7 … Continue reading

On the Web (July 24, 2012)

On the web: Tommy Wasserman notes a new iOS app for New Testament manuscripts. E. K. McFall has the latest article in the Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism: “Are Dionysos and Oedipus Name Variatnios for Satan and Antichrist?” Dan Wallace recounts an experience of reading a manuscript that “doesn’t exist.” Alin Suciu highlights Lorenzo … Continue reading

David, the Man of God

In contemporary English parlance, to call someone a “man” or “woman of God” substantially means that individual is “godly” or “pious.” As such, the phrase is a descriptor of a person’s moral or religious standing in relation to some perceived measure. In the Hebrew Bible, however, אישׁ (ה)אלהים ([the] man of God) regularly designates a … Continue reading

Origen on the Web (June 22, 2012)

On the web: Jim Davila reports the discovery of some previously lost Greek homilies on the Psalms, potentially by Origen (1, 2). Peter Williams provides a link to a set of images of the manuscript. Roger Pearse comments on the press release and quotes Jerome’s catalogue of Origen’s writings. Alin Suciu passes along a letter … Continue reading

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